facebook
twitter
vk
instagram
linkedin
google+
tumblr
akademia
youtube
skype
mendeley
Wiki
Global international scientific
analytical project
GISAP
GISAP logotip
Перевод страницы
 

IS AMERICAN STUDENT SLANG OUT-OF-DATE?

IS AMERICAN STUDENT SLANG OUT-OF-DATE?IS AMERICAN STUDENT SLANG OUT-OF-DATE?
Елена Назаренко, преподаватель

Дорда Виталий, кандидат филологических наук, доцент

Сумской государственный университет, Украина

Участник первенства: Национальное первенство по научной аналитике - "Украина";

The article focuses on the evolution of sources of American student slang and its role in enlarging the vocabulary of Standard English. The authors analyse the scholars' works written in the last century in terms of their relevance at this point in time.  Informal English and Standard English have much in common regarding the development process and the issue of their fruitful coexistence is a unique area for linguistic research.

Keywords: slang, student/college slang, social group, sources, origin, Standard English.

Статья посвящена эволюции источников американского студенческого сленга и его роли в увеличении словарного состава литературного английского языка. Авторы анализируют работы ученых, написанные в прошлом веке, с точки зрения их релевантности на данный момент. Неофициальный английский и литературный английский имеют много общего в процессе развития, и тема их продуктивного сосуществования является уникальным объектом для лингвистических исследований.

Ключевые слова: сленг, студенческий сленг, социальная группа, источники, происхождение, литературный английский.

 

Everyone has an idea what slang is, but any two people's thoughts on this subject are likely to be different, and there has been much controversial research of this topic.

While there are a number of excellent collections of American slang — the best and most comprehensive are Chapman [4], a revision and extension of Wentworth and Flexner [12]; Partridge [9], whose name is most prominently associated with collections of slang, gives some attention to American as well as British student/college slang — the topic has received little study by English and American linguists, despite a recent surge of interest in theoretical approaches to the lexicon. The single exception to this generalization is the work of Connie Eble of the University of North Carolina, who published a new paper on the slang used by U.N.C. students almost every year [7], and edited College Slang 101 [6], a short textbook on slang. Among Ukrainian scholars dealing with the topic of slang we can single out Y. Zatsny [2], U. Potyatynnyk [3], V. Balabin [1] and others. Now, when the English language is developing at huge speed taking into account the appearance of new words almost every day on such resources like Word Spy [14] or OxfordDictionaries.com [10], we cannot ignore the role of student slang in forming the Standard English.

Defining slang, and college slang in particular, is not as easy as it may seem. Initially one may feel that slang is simply "not proper English" or just whatever is not in a standard dictionary. Following a number of authorities (especially Dumas and Lighter [5]), however, we claim that a number of categories of words that might fit these criteria should not be included on list of college slang: we thus do not consider substandard expressions like ain't, regional or "dialect" expressions, and baby talk words like doggie, for example, to be slang. The residue of nonstandard language, however, includes not only true slang but also informal or colloquial language — the sort of words and expressions that anyone might use in conversation or a letter, but that would be out of place in a speech or formal essay.

Most authorities conclude that slang is the language means to mark the user as part of a distinct social group, and we have used this criterion in deciding what expressions qualify as college slang. We have usually tried not to investigate informal or colloquial expressions that would be familiar, in the same form and with the same meaning, to any English speaker, but have included mainly expressions that are characteristic of American college students in general. A few words in our research, however, have almost exactly the same definition with which they would be listed in a standard dictionary: two examples areinebriated 'drunk' and strumpet 'slut'. Such words are considered to be "revivals"— words that we feel are not in common colloquial use among the general population and whose use is characteristic of student vocabulary.

A category of words that is often confused with slang is jargon: the specialized vocabulary of a particular group. While words which begin as jargon (in California, for instance, surfers' jargon) sometimes may be transferred to the general slang vocabulary of ordinary speakers, we have tried to eliminate true jargon from our research. (There is a sense, of course, in which many of the words on our list could be considered student jargon, since they refer to test-taking and other activities not usually practiced by the general population).

The slang expressions come from a variety of sources. Many are derived directly from the standard vocabulary with little or no change in meaning: they may be revivals of old standard words that are no longer in general use (like strumpet, discussed above) or new uses of standard words or earlier slang expressions. For instance, earlier slang bug 'to annoy', a transitive verb, has given rise to an intransitive verb meaning 'to be annoying'; standard informal chow 'food' becomes a verb 'to eat'; standard perpetrate 'to commit (an offense)' can now be used to mean 'to act fraudulently'. (Detransitivization of standard transitive verbs proves to be particularly common in student slang). Other slang expressions have completely new definitions for standard words, such as grovel 'to make out', or wrap 'girlfriend'.

Metaphors play a part in the development of slang vocabulary. For instance, many college slang words for 'drunk' derive from standard words meaning 'destroyed' or 'torn': examples include blasted, blitzed, bombed, ripped, shredded, slaughtered, and tattered. Traditional sources frequently observe that slang vocabulary is exceptionally "vivid": we interpret this comment to refer simply to the fact that slang often makes use of novel metaphors. Blow chunks initially seems like a disturbingly colorful way to say 'to vomit', yet the literal meaning of this expression is almost the same as the colloquial throw up: the difference is that because we have heard throw up so many times it has lost its power to shock. Many metaphorical expressions in college slang are irreverent — for instance, Einstein 'pubic hair' is inspired by the great physicist's wild, curly hair. Some slang words are puns — Babylon, for instance, is the place where attractive females (babes) come from, and thus may be pronounced like "baby lawn" as well as in the expected way.

A number of words are derived by what Eble has called "acronymy" [7, p. 24]: we understand this term to mean the use of initials in forming new expressions. A true acronym, of course, is a set of initials pronounced like an ordinary word (like NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization). Our study includes only a few true acronyms, like SNAG 'nice guy' (from sensitive new-age guy), and some other expressions which are based on partial acronyms, such as beemer 'B.M.W. car.' But there are many other acronymic expressions in student slang consisting of initials pronounced separately such as M.O.S. 'member of the opposite sex' or S.O.L. 'out of luck' (from shit out of luck). As the last example indicates, acronymy often is employed euphemistically. In the dictionary of college slang Slang-U by P. Munro [11], the author has followed the convention of writing initials pronounced separately with periods (but no spaces) between them: sequences of initials pronounced as complete words are written without periods.

Another common source for slang expressions is clipping, the shortening of standard words. Often this involves simply dropping part (usually the end) of a word: def comes from ‘definite’or ‘definitely’; ob is from ‘obvious’or ‘obviously’; veg is from ‘vegetate’. Dis 'be mean to' is an unusual case, from which everything has been clipped except the negative prefix dis-: it's not even clear what the source of this word is — ‘disregard’ or ‘disrespect’ or ‘disappoint’.Sometimes more than one clipped word may be combined, as in sped 'slow, stupid person' (from special education). Other items on the list are blends of two separate slang or standard words, like dimbo 'dumb bimbo' and gork 'loser', an apparent blend of the slang words ‘geek’ and ‘dork’.

Still other new slang words are formed from both standard and slang words by regular English derivational processes. For instance, -ette is suffixed to create feminine forms of stud 'person who has done something outstanding; conceited person' and, perhaps more surprisingly, mazeh 'gorgeous guy', a word based on a Hebrew expression (and reportedly coined by former Hebrew school students). The adjectival suffix -y combines with suck 'to be bad' to form sucky 'awful'. The negative prefix un- plus the familiar slang word cool 'very good, excellent' yields uncool 'not good, unfair, tactless'. Compounding is also a common source of slang vocabulary, as words like beauhunk 'boyfriend', brainfart '(exclamation used about a sudden loss of memory or train of thought)', and studmuffin 'strong, muscular person; cute person, achiever' illustrate.

Another process that operates in the development of slang vocabulary (and helps it mystify outsiders) is the ironic use of a word to indicate its semantic opposite [2, p.116]. The slang use of bad to mean 'good' is well-known; our research also includes such examples as mental giant 'unintelligent person', pretty 'ridiculous', and Yeah, right! 'I don't believe you!' Often such new uses originate with heavy sarcastic intonation, but when the new meaning gains acceptance, this special intonation is no longer required. A number of words college slang have two dramatically different meanings, of which the negative one is original: badass 'very good' / 'bad', deadly 'very good' / 'very bad', killer 'fantastic' / 'bad', wicked 'excellent' / 'bad'.

As Eble observed, many student slang expressions correlated with popular culture, with movies in particular [7, p.34]. Examples in our list include Sally 'meticulous person' (from When Harry Met Sally, 1989), Heather 'superficial girl' (from Heathers, 1989), bushbitch 'ugly girl' (from Eddie Murphy Raw, 1987), have missile lock 'to concentrate on or make a target of someone' (from Top Gun, 1986), McFly 'person with no intelligence' (from George McFly, a character in Back to the Future, 1985), and slip (someone) the hot beef injection 'to have sex with (someone)' (from The Breakfast Club, 1985). Most such expressions came from the media of the middle to late 1980s, but others persist from earlier periods: bodacious tatas 'breasts' is from An Officer and a Gentleman (1982); ralph 'penis' is from Judy Blume's book Forever (1975). Expressions relating to old cartoon shows endure especially well: these include wilma 'ugly woman' and other expressions based on "The Flintstones," scoob 'to eat, have some food (especially snacks)' (from "Scooby Doo"), and Magoo 'old man slowly driving a car' (from "Mr. Magoo").

This correlation is still productive. The term nuke the fridge was coined in 2008 “in the wake of ‘Indiana Jones the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,’ in which Indy survives an atomic bomb blast by hiding in a refrigerator. The Spielberg face, which refers to director Steven Spielberg, was coined last year by Kevin B. Lee who compiled a video essay of these close-up shots of actors with “eyes open, staring in wordless wonder in a moment where time stands still,” a look that “has come to be shorthand for a cinematic discovery on the part of the characters and the audience [13].

Slang words allude not only to popular culture but also to classical mythology. Cf. adonis 'extremely nice-looking [of a male]; extremely nice-looking young man' and nectar 'alcoholic beverage; outstanding'. Carpe diem! 'Go for it!' is a mixture of modern and classical: the Latin phrase for 'Seize the day!' was introduced to today's students in the 1989 movie Dead Poets Society.

Chapman's dictionary reveals that Black English is an extremely important source of slang expressions. This is obvious with expressions like homeboy, which are popularly identified with black culture; our citations from Chapman show that many other expressions, such as boss 'great', ripped 'drunk', and kick back 'to relax', also come from Black English. Real or imagined Black English pronunciation is responsible for other items, such as ho (from whore) and thang (from thing).

In addition to words like those discussed above, whose etymology is fairly clear, our list also includes some completely new words that do not appear in any form in standard dictionaries or in collections of slang such as Chapman's. Some examples from our list include foof 'superficial person', Yar! 'Good!', and zuke 'to vomit'. As Maurer and High observe, such "true neologisms" are the rarest source of new additions to vocabulary [8, p.191].

Slang words come and go. Some slang expressions are no longer recognized by speakers just a few years later, other slang words come to be accepted as standard language, while still others persist as slang for many years. Hence, the answer to the question in the article title is definitely negative. American student slang is not only the productive source of Standard English, it is also a wide field of linguistics to be researched and studied.

 

References:

  • 1.      Балабін В.В. Сучасний американський військовий сленг як проблема перекладу. – К.: Логос, 2002. – 313 с.
  • 2.      Зацний Ю.А. Розвиток словникового складу сучасної англійської мови. – Запоріжжя: Запорізький держ.ун-т, 1998. – 430 с.
  • 3.      Потятинник У.О. Соціолінгвістичні та прагмастилістичні аспекти функціонування сленгової лексики (на матеріалах періодики США).  - Дис.   ...   канд.   філол.   наук,   10.02.04.  – Львів, 2003.- 246 с.
  • 4.      Chapman, Robert L. New Dictionary of American Slang. New York: Harper&Row, 1986. – 485 p.
  • 5.      Dumas, Bethany K., and Jonathan Lighter. Is Slang a Word for Linguistics? American Speech 53 (1978): PP. 5-16.
  • 6.      EbleC. CollegeSlang 101.Georgetown, CT: Spectacle Lane Press, 1989. – 208 p.
  • 7.      Eble C. Slang and Sociability: in-group language among college students. – Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1996. – 228 p.
  • 8.      Maurer, David W., and Ellesa Clay High. New Words – Where Do They Come From and Where Do they Go? American Speech 55 (1980): PP.184-194.
  • 9.      Partridge E. Usage and Abusage. – Penguin Books, 1973. – 380 p.
  • 10.  Recent updates to Oxford Dictionaries (2015). <http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/what-s-new>  Oxford University Press
  • 11.  SlangU.The Official Dictionary of College Slang. Compiled by P. Munro. – Harmony Books/New York. – 1991. – 244 p.
  • 12.  Wentworth, Harold, and Stuart Berg Flexner. Dictionary of American Slang. - New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1975. – 669 p.
  • 13.  Word Soup: Movie Words (2016). http://blog.wordnik.com/word-soup-movie-words
  • 14.  Word Spy. The Word Lover’s Guide to New Words (2016).  http://www.wordspy.com
0
Ваша оценка: Нет Средняя: 6.1 (7 голосов)
Комментарии: 14

Михайло Лукащук

Шановні колеги! Ви провели цікаве дослідження на таку цікаву і актуальну тему як вживання сленгу. Спасибі та плідної праці в майбутньому.

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Дуже дякуємо за Вашу схвальну оцінку та щиру цікавість до нашої роботи! Бажаємо натхнення і цікавих наукових відкриттів!

Концевая Галина

Уважаемые коллеги, спасибо за интересное исследование на актуальную тему. Характерно ли лексико-семантическое словообразование студенческому сленгу? Новых Вам научных находок и свершений!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Уважаемая Галина, спасибо за искренний интерес к нашей работе! Лексико-семантический способ является одним из ключевых в процессе образования студенческих сленгизмов. С уважением, Виталий Дорда и Елена Назаренко.

Залевская Александра Александровна

Уважаемые коллеги, Вы предприняли актуальное исследование, связанное и проблемой пополнения общеязыкового словаря за счёт языковых единиц сленгового происхождения, рассмотрели различные источники появления сленга американских студентов. Тем не мене остаётся открытым вопрос: в чём же состоит завяленная в аннотациях статьи эволюция источников американского студенческого сленга? Какие из таких источников стали более популярными, а какие оказываются редкими или вообще не регистрируются в числе вхождений в новейшие электронные словари? Конечно, идёт постоянное появление новых языковых единиц, многие из них оказываются «однодневками», но источники и способы «рождения» новой языковой единицы поддаются моделированию и сопоставлению по степени их актуальности в тот или иной временной период. Желаю дальнейших успехов, Александра Александровна

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо большое за вопрос. Мы рассматривали эволюцию источников сленга в контексте производительности и в сравнении с источниками стандартного языка. Например, словообразовательный анализ нашего фактического материала показал, что способы словообразования, характерные для современного английского языка в целом, присущи и студенческому сленгу, однако их производительность и частотность в сленге отличаются от стандартного языка. Так, самые популярные способы словообразования в сленге – это словосложение и сокращение, хотя традиционно продуктивными способами считаются конверсия, аффиксация и словосложение. В нашем исследовании конверсия за частотностью намного отстает от самых способов словообразования, аффиксация также играет в сленге незначительную роль. Эволюцией источников студенческого сленга можно также считать широкое использование внутриязыковых заимствований. Проблема регистрации сленга в словарях безусловно остается, поскольку в случае сленга, как правило, удобнее пользоваться онлайн ресурсами, которые регулярно пополняются новыми номинациями. Их нельзя назвать словарями в классическом понимании, но они помогают дать представление о том или ином сленгизме. С уважением, Виталий Дорда и Елена Назаренко.

Кобякова Ирина

Уважаемая коллега! Ваши исследования всегда читаю с интересом. Спасибо и за этот доклад! Желаю будущих успехов!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Ирина! Будем и дальше стараться представлять актуальные и глубокие разработки. Вам желаем здоровья и творческих успехов! Елена.

Косых Елена Анатольевна

Уважаемые коллеги! Ваш доклад отличается интересным и основательным описанием социолекта. Работа выполнена на высоком уровне, содержит новый материал, отражающий одну из сфер функционирования языка. Выводы и указанные Вами источники и причины появления новых значений у старых "знакомцев" не вызывают сомнений. Успехов!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Уважаемая Елена Анатольевна! Нам очень приятно и ценно Ваше высокое мнение о результатах нашей работы. Желаем Вам удачи и успехов в Ваших исследованиях! С уважением, Елена.

Баласанян Марианна Альбертовна

Уважаемые коллеги. большое спасибо за интересную работу. Статья выполнена на высоком научном уровне, содержит ряд выводов, представляющих практический интерес. Удачи. С уважением, Баласанян М.

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Марианна Альбертовна!Нам очень приятно и ценно Ваше высокое мнение о нашей работе! И Вам удачи! С уважением, Елена.

Хамзе Димитрина

Уважаемые коллеги! Благодарю Вас сердечно за столь интересный и актуальный доклад! Когнитивная точка зрения, особенно в сфере метафоры, иронии и неологизмов и их роль в продуцировании сленговых единиц будет весьма подходящая. С уважением и наилучшими пожеланиями! Димитрина

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Димитрина! Ваше мнение очень ценно для нас! Будем продолжать и развивать наши исследования в данном ключе. В свою очередь желаем Вам новых научных горизонтов! С уважением, Елена.
Комментарии: 14

Михайло Лукащук

Шановні колеги! Ви провели цікаве дослідження на таку цікаву і актуальну тему як вживання сленгу. Спасибі та плідної праці в майбутньому.

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Дуже дякуємо за Вашу схвальну оцінку та щиру цікавість до нашої роботи! Бажаємо натхнення і цікавих наукових відкриттів!

Концевая Галина

Уважаемые коллеги, спасибо за интересное исследование на актуальную тему. Характерно ли лексико-семантическое словообразование студенческому сленгу? Новых Вам научных находок и свершений!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Уважаемая Галина, спасибо за искренний интерес к нашей работе! Лексико-семантический способ является одним из ключевых в процессе образования студенческих сленгизмов. С уважением, Виталий Дорда и Елена Назаренко.

Залевская Александра Александровна

Уважаемые коллеги, Вы предприняли актуальное исследование, связанное и проблемой пополнения общеязыкового словаря за счёт языковых единиц сленгового происхождения, рассмотрели различные источники появления сленга американских студентов. Тем не мене остаётся открытым вопрос: в чём же состоит завяленная в аннотациях статьи эволюция источников американского студенческого сленга? Какие из таких источников стали более популярными, а какие оказываются редкими или вообще не регистрируются в числе вхождений в новейшие электронные словари? Конечно, идёт постоянное появление новых языковых единиц, многие из них оказываются «однодневками», но источники и способы «рождения» новой языковой единицы поддаются моделированию и сопоставлению по степени их актуальности в тот или иной временной период. Желаю дальнейших успехов, Александра Александровна

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо большое за вопрос. Мы рассматривали эволюцию источников сленга в контексте производительности и в сравнении с источниками стандартного языка. Например, словообразовательный анализ нашего фактического материала показал, что способы словообразования, характерные для современного английского языка в целом, присущи и студенческому сленгу, однако их производительность и частотность в сленге отличаются от стандартного языка. Так, самые популярные способы словообразования в сленге – это словосложение и сокращение, хотя традиционно продуктивными способами считаются конверсия, аффиксация и словосложение. В нашем исследовании конверсия за частотностью намного отстает от самых способов словообразования, аффиксация также играет в сленге незначительную роль. Эволюцией источников студенческого сленга можно также считать широкое использование внутриязыковых заимствований. Проблема регистрации сленга в словарях безусловно остается, поскольку в случае сленга, как правило, удобнее пользоваться онлайн ресурсами, которые регулярно пополняются новыми номинациями. Их нельзя назвать словарями в классическом понимании, но они помогают дать представление о том или ином сленгизме. С уважением, Виталий Дорда и Елена Назаренко.

Кобякова Ирина

Уважаемая коллега! Ваши исследования всегда читаю с интересом. Спасибо и за этот доклад! Желаю будущих успехов!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Ирина! Будем и дальше стараться представлять актуальные и глубокие разработки. Вам желаем здоровья и творческих успехов! Елена.

Косых Елена Анатольевна

Уважаемые коллеги! Ваш доклад отличается интересным и основательным описанием социолекта. Работа выполнена на высоком уровне, содержит новый материал, отражающий одну из сфер функционирования языка. Выводы и указанные Вами источники и причины появления новых значений у старых "знакомцев" не вызывают сомнений. Успехов!

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Уважаемая Елена Анатольевна! Нам очень приятно и ценно Ваше высокое мнение о результатах нашей работы. Желаем Вам удачи и успехов в Ваших исследованиях! С уважением, Елена.

Баласанян Марианна Альбертовна

Уважаемые коллеги. большое спасибо за интересную работу. Статья выполнена на высоком научном уровне, содержит ряд выводов, представляющих практический интерес. Удачи. С уважением, Баласанян М.

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Марианна Альбертовна!Нам очень приятно и ценно Ваше высокое мнение о нашей работе! И Вам удачи! С уважением, Елена.

Хамзе Димитрина

Уважаемые коллеги! Благодарю Вас сердечно за столь интересный и актуальный доклад! Когнитивная точка зрения, особенно в сфере метафоры, иронии и неологизмов и их роль в продуцировании сленговых единиц будет весьма подходящая. С уважением и наилучшими пожеланиями! Димитрина

Назаренко Елена Вячеславовна

Спасибо, уважаемая Димитрина! Ваше мнение очень ценно для нас! Будем продолжать и развивать наши исследования в данном ключе. В свою очередь желаем Вам новых научных горизонтов! С уважением, Елена.
Партнеры
 
 
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
Would you like to know all the news about GISAP project and be up to date of all news from GISAP? Register for free news right now and you will be receiving them on your e-mail right away as soon as they are published on GISAP portal.